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Pre ortho treatment                                          Post ortho treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patient: Male, in his 20’s was unhappy with the appearance of his teeth

Treatment: Fixed Bracket Orthodontics with Dr Helen Walsh

Duration of treatment: 5 months

Cost: € 2995 including upper and lower fixed and removable retainers, as well as professional tooth whitening.

No re-touching of photographs has been done.

For further information on our orthodontic treatments visit here. To book an appointment for an orthodontic assessment contact us on T: 01 4542022 or E: info@portobellodental.com

Almost on a weekly basis, we get asked whether it’s ok to have dental treatment while there is a cold sore present.

Before I answer this question, I will explain the causes and current treatments available for the common cold sore (which is caused by the Herpes Simplex type 1virus).

What causes them to occur?

Cold sores are caused by the HS virus (Usually type 1 for oral cold sores)-this virus is generally transmitted during early childhood via saliva i.e. kissing your baby, children sharing eating utensils, although the virus can lie dormant in the nervous system until triggered, which can be many years later.

Cold sores can be brought on by stress, menstruation, bright sunlight, wind damage, sunburn, fever, or local skin trauma. Even kissing someone with stubble! Surgical procedures such as dental or neural surgery lip tattooing, or microdermabrasion or facial resurfacing are also common triggers.

How will I know if I am getting a cold sore??

When you are about to get a cold sore, you will generally experience some or all of the following at the site where the cold sore will appear:

a)      Tingling (prodromal) stage: Itching, burning, tingling, and/or pain signal the start of a cold sore.

b)      Redness (erythema) stage: Swelling, redness, and soreness begin.

Then after this phase has passed we see:

c)      Small bumps (papule) stage: Small bumps develop and swelling may continue.

d)     Blister (vesicle) stage: One or more fluid-filled blisters form.

e)      Soft crust (ulcer) stage: Blisters break open and form an ulcer

Finally we see:

f)       Hard crust stage: Drying of the ulcer results in a scab and the hard crust disappears

g)      Remaining symptoms stage: Swelling, dry skin flakes, and/or redness remain after loss of the hard crust, and returning to the…….

h)       Normal skin stage: Cold sore disappears and normal skin returns

 

How can I treat/get rid of my cold core(s)?

Treatments available depend on what stage you start treatment:

Acyclivor topical cream is available in Ireland as Zovirax. This anti -viral topical cream which works by stopping the virus from copying itself, causing shorter outbreaks. It is a treatment for cold sores, not a cure.

Compeed Cold Sore Patch-this patch covers and protects the cold sore lesion, creating the optimal germ-free healing environment for faster healing and prevention of scab formation.

Plenty of other types of treatments exist for treatment for cold sores, but most centre around drying out the blister (applying alcohol Perfumes, Red wine sediment). Moisturizing the soft or hard crusts aids healing.

If you suffer from repeated severe episodes of cold sores, see your G.P., as a systemic course of anti viral medication could see you cold sore free for up to six months.

After your cold sore has healed, you may feel the area is still slightly raised. If this is the case, the root of the cold sore is living just under the skin. as such mild triggers can bring about another cold sore. Using a really rich moisturizer or vaseline for 3-4 weeks at night time can allow skin layers to shed evenly, and this will shed the root.

Finally Can I have dental treatment whilst I have a cold sore?

Technically, yes you can—but we consider it best to avoid all non-emergency dental treatments if possible, as the healing of the cold sore may be delayed due to the aggravation of the lips being stretched during treatment. Equally, it is ok to have dental treatment once you have passed the infectious stage—which is just after the vesicles have started to heal over and form the soft crust stage.

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Wednesday 16th September is Mouth Cancer Awareness day, and as part of our commitment to promoting dental health in Ireland, we are offering FREE oral cancer checks on the day to anybody who would like a professional screening. You do not have to be a patient at Portobello Dental Clinic to attend, and the screening process only takes 10 minutes of your time. If you would like to attend, please call us on 01 4542022 to schedule your appointment.
For more information on mouth cancer please read our previous blog post, Oral (Mouth) Cancer – Incidence, Diagnosis and Treatment.

How do I help my children look after their teeth?

Teaching your child, good oral care at a young age is an investment in their health that will stay with them for life. You can start by setting an example, taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is very important and anything that makes taking care of teeth fun, like brushing along with your child or letting them choose their own toothbrush, encourages good oral care.

To help your children protect their teeth and gums and greatly reduce their risk of getting cavities, teach them to follow these simple steps:

  1. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove plaque-the sticky film on teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay.
  2. Floss daily to remove plaque from between your teeth and under the gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a professional cleaning.
  3. Eat a well-balanced diet that limits starchy or sugary foods, which produce plaque acids that cause tooth decay. When you do eat these foods, try to eat them with your meal instead of as a snack-the extra saliva produced during a meal helps rinse food from the mouth.
  4. Use dental products that contain fluoride, including toothpaste.
  5. Take your child to our dentist for regular check-ups.

What Brushing Techniques Can I Show My Child?

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You may want to supervise your children until they get the hang of these simple steps:

  1. Use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Take care that your child does not swallow the toothpaste(this is difficult with very young children-so we recommend using a children’s toothpaste which contains lower levels of fluoride).
  2. Using a soft-bristled toothbrush, brush the inside surface of each tooth first, where plaque may accumulate most. Brush gently back and forth.
  3. Clean the outer surfaces of each tooth. Angle the brush along the outer gum line. Gently brush back and forth.
  4. Brush the chewing surface of each tooth. Gently brush back and forth.
  5. Use the tip of the brush to clean behind each front tooth, both top and bottom.
  6. It’s always fun to brush the tongue!

How important is Diet to my child’s Oral Health?

A balanced diet is necessary for your child to develop strong, decay-resistant teeth. In addition to a full range of vitamins and minerals, a child’s diet should include plenty of calcium, phosphorous and proper levels of fluoride. If fluoride is your child’s greatest protection against tooth decay, then frequent snacking may be the biggest enemy. The sugars and starches found in many foods like biscuits, sweets, soft drinks and even some savoury snacks are food for bacteria in dental plaque and are converted to acids. These acids attack the tooth enamel and can lead to cavities.
Each “plaque attack” can last up to 20 minutes after a meal or snack has been finished. Even a little nibble can create plaque acids. So it’s best to limit snacking between meals.

For more info on diet and dental health please see Link to diet advice hyg section

What should I do if my child chips, breaks or knocks out a tooth?

With any injury to your child’s mouth, you should contact Our dentist immediately. Our dentist will want to examine the affected area and determine appropriate treatment.

If your child is in pain from a broken, cracked or chipped tooth, you should visit our dentist immediately. You may want to give an over-the-counter pain reliever to your child until his/her appointment. If possible, keep any part of the tooth that has broken off and take this with you to our dentist.

If a tooth is completely knocked out of the mouth by an injury, take the tooth to your dentist as soon as possible. Handle the tooth as little as possible-do not wipe or otherwise clean the tooth. Store the tooth in a cup of fresh milk (never ever store it in tap water or wash/wipe it clean) until you get to a dentist. It may be possible for the tooth to be placed back into your child’s mouth, a procedure called re-implantation.

What are dental Fissure Sealants and how do I know if my child needs them?

A dental sealant creates a highly effective barrier against decay. Sealants are thin plastic coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of a child’s permanent back teeth, where most cavities form. Applying a sealant is not painful and can be performed in one dental visit. Your dentist can tell you whether your child might benefit from a dental sealant.

For more info on fissure sealants visit Link to fissure sealants hyg page

At what age should my child start Orthodontic Treatment?

This has to be one of the most commonly asked questions by concerned parents. It can be very confusing as when dropping your child off at the school gates, some children are wearing braces and some are not.
The answer is that current studies indicate that there is NO benefit to starting Orthodontic treatment early on your child—all it seems to do is prolong the duration of treatment for them , and the finish date is still roughly the same age.
So, the current recommendations are that Orthodontic treatment should be started while the second baby molar is still present and before the second adult molar comes through–this is roughly around 11-12 years of age.

For more complex cases, where the upper teeth appear more prominent than the lower teeth (buck teeth), treatment is indicated before the pre-teen growth spurt (usually 11.5 yrs for a girl, and 12.5 yrs for a boy).
If your child does not appear to have canine (eye/fang) teeth erupting or palpable, then it has been shown that some benefit may be derived from your dentist electively extracting the baby canines around 10 years of age.

Once treatment starts, your child should have regular dental check-ups, and visits to the hygienist, as their orthodontist will primarily focus on the position of the teeth, and assume that the child is having regular dental examinations with their general dental practitioners.

Which toothpaste is best for children?

The current advice is that adult toothpastes should be used for children over 2 years of age, and NO toothpaste before then. This is down to the fluoride content in the toothpastes-proprietary childrens toothpastes do not contain high enough levels of Fluoride. From a taste perspective, this presents a challenge as most children complain of a burning sensation from the general adult toothpastes (the mint and eucalyptus flavours tend to burn their sensitive and tender gums and mucosa).